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Six tips to help you manage stress

November 6, 2018

By Taylor Flood

Put the phone down

It’s easy to get caught up in what other people are doing and posting online and compare yourself to them. The good news is that you control who you follow on social media. Unfollow people whose posts constantly bring you down and follow accounts that add value to your day.  Remember, social media is a highlight reel of people's lives and everyone is on a different path.

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Get active

Physical activity increases your endorphin levels (the feel-good hormone), which can improve your mood and decrease stress levels. Exercise can also help you sleep better, which will reduce your stress levels while you sleep. Take advantage of on-campus resources such as the Flex, open gym time, and fitness classes.

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Play with animals

There are so many benefits to programs like St. John’s Ambulance Therapy Dogs, and services like it have grown tremendously popular in the last few years. Playing with and petting dogs and other animals offers a unique form of stress relief, distraction, and increase in social interaction. If you don’t have easy access to a pet, keep an eye out for any therapy dog sessions offered at the university, or look for volunteering opportunities at local animal rescues.  

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Create to-do lists

Balancing school, work, and a social life can be a pretty big task. Staying organized with to-do lists and agendas can make a world of difference. Being able to see what your week ahead looks like will help you prioritize tasks and manage your time appropriately, ultimately leading to less stress!  

 

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Take a personal care day

Spend time doing things that make you feel good (and no, this doesn’t necessarily mean spending the day in bed watching Netflix!) Take a nature walk, have a nice long bath or shower, go to lunch, treat yourself to a new top, or take part in your favourite activity! Do whatever you think of when you hear, “pamper yourself.”  Spend time reflecting on what’s important to you and how you can prioritize your needs and your happiness.

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Talk to a professional

Talking to a professional on mental health in a safe, confidential, and non-judgemental space can allow you to be open and honest in a way that you sometimes can’t be around family and friends. Professionals will work with you to understand issues you’re having and help you implement strategies to make changes.  Getting a perspective from someone who isn’t part of your daily life can help address behaviours your friends and family may not see. Check out the helpful resources available to you on campus as a student on the Student Life website


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