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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

My take on online school

November 17, 2020

The education system, especially post-secondary institutions have seen a dramatic change directly accounted for by COVID-19 and the resulting pandemic. Life has changed for many of us since March of this year, however, for students like myself, this change became clearly apparent with online course delivery. I know myself as well as many others were not shocked by this announcement, however, we were disappointed due to the lack of normal school experience we’ve been accustomed to. With online course delivery having been in place for a couple of months now, I have to say I was not expecting to like it as much as I do. Below are the reasons why I have been enjoying online course delivery much better in comparison to in-person courses.

No more cramped bus rides

As a commuter student, I lose two hours of my day each time I attend school due to my commute to school and back. This is met with my least favorite part which includes waiting on busses that almost never arrive on time and I can almost guarantee will be crowded beyond the shadow of a doubt. This rather dull part of my day has since been replaced with time allocated to sleeping in, eating, or completing my school work. This two-hour period regardless of how small it may sound has been a blessing in disguise.

via GIPHY

Watching lectures from bed

With no need to be in school physically, I am able to attend lectures from the comfort of my bed. I am most often still in my PJs especially for those early lectures. This has been the best perk of online school. The ability to choose a comfortable location to do my learning always puts me in a great mood. This will be what I miss most about this rather strange time because it is unbeatable. 

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Time for myself

With school being in person in the past, it was difficult for me to squeeze in time to enjoy doing things I enjoy. Now although still busy with school work among other things, I have found I have slightly more time available to watch documentaries on Netflix, focus on my photography Instagram, go on hikes, and spend time with my family who are also home more often. 

via GIPHY

With this said, I am not upset at the idea of returning to school in person as I miss social interactions and library study dates with friends as much as the next person does. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages so it’s important to try to adapt your learning regardless of the delivery form to ensure you are making the best of the situation. As for myself, I will be enjoying my hot chocolate in bed snuggled in blankets attending my lecture to learn about receptor drug interactions.